Know More About Flexible Working

January 15th, 2021 | Posted in How To Grow, Uncategorized

Working flexible hours, or flexi-hours as they’re often called, is a practise which has been increasingly used by many companies since the early 1970’s. With the advent of the digital age, home-computers, and the internet, a greater number of companies are looking at ways to increase company profitability, while improving job satisfaction amongst their employees.

Improved Company Employee Relations:

Many companies have turned to flexible working to better relations with their workforce, retain staff, and reduce sick-time. We live in an age where family responsibilities and work commitments have to be prioritised by many employees. These additional concerns can induce greater levels of stress, reduce output, and promote higher levels of sick leave. All of which have a negative financial effect for the company.

For many employees, the chance of working from home, beginning their working day a couple of hours earlier, or later, can make all the difference when juggling work and family commitments.

Even on the shop floor. If staff have to spend an hour or two commuting to work on crowded roads or packed trains, they’re not going to be in the best frame of mind to put in their most productive day’s work. The option of starting earlier or later, and finishing the same, may be all it needs to reduce travelling time, relieve stress, improve morale, and increase output.

Reducing Costs:

Work from home is the ideal situation for a large number of today’s workforce. Given the opportunity to do so, they provide higher levels of commitment and increased output. Working their own flexible hours they are more likely to start earlier or finish later should work load require, while taking thirty minutes off to take the kids to nursery school.

Many couples have found one partner working full-time, and one part-time, is the ideal way to manage family and work commitments. To take full advantage of this, companies are ‘sharing’ many office positions, allowing two members of staff to share the same job, desk, and computer, while splitting the working week between them.

The greater the number of staff able to work from home reduces the need to expand to larger premises with all the additional costs involved. While employees working fewer hours, so as to attend to personal or family needs, will feel greater company loyalty, and provide higher output.

Moving from Normal to Flexible Working:

Changing company practises from the normal 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. or 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. hours, to a flexible mode of operation, requires consultation with staff on all levels, including the factory floor. Most company bosses agree that, although the move can be challenging, it is not insurmountable.

Of prime concern to any business is keeping good customer relations. Maintaining continuity of commitments and delivery dates, while endeavouring to satisfy employee flexible working practises, can prove demanding in the early days. With the change in working practises, employees need to be kept up to date on company policy. They need to be aware of customer needs and those of their work colleagues.

While some may be allowed to work from home, others may not, and this could cause resentment between staff. The reasons need to be adequately explained as to why one can and one can’t, to avoid any build up of ill feeling.

Should the move to flexi-hours require certain staff members taking on additional responsibilities, adequate training needs to be put in place to provide a more versatile workforce.

A major change in Working Practises:

Although moving from normal to flexible working practises is a major change within any company, it doesn’t need to happen all at once. Many companies today work a mixture of both, bringing in flexible working where possible, while maintaining a normal working week where it is not.

Good communications are the key to any major change in policy. Discussing all concerns with employees; why the company wishes to move to flexible working, the employees job security after the move, and why some can go flexible and some can’t. Treat the workforce as a team with a ‘we’re all in it together’ attitude, and face concerns using a team approach, will usually resolve these genuine concerns.

The Boss remains The Boss:

From a management point of view, seeing half the workforce going flexible doesn’t mean you only have half the workforce to worry about. Ensure staff, with their new found independence, realise they still have a boss to answer to – company commitments to follow – and a work ethic they are expected to adhere to.

A win-win situation:

Carried out correctly, a move to full or partial flexible working can be a win situation for both company and employees. The company gains from reduced costs, saving money on having to obtain larger premises. With a less stressed, happier workforce, productivity increases, time off sick reduces, and a greater number of skilled staff are able to be retained. Many professionals these days actively seek flexible employment, accepting lower remuneration in return for greater time with family, or to pursue outside interests.

Employees benefit from a better balanced lifestyle. The difficulty of juggling home and family with a need to provide an adequate income is removed. They become happier, more relaxed, and family relationships improve. For all concerned, a win-win situation.

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Do Your Employees Hate You? Read This To Find Out Why!

September 19th, 2020 | Posted in Loud Mouth, Uncategorized

When people get new jobs, they expect to carry out their work in a friendly setting. But, for some folks, the truth is their bosses can make their lives a misery. Some individuals just aren’t cut out to be managers! And, they’re often the reason for issues like high staff turnover.

Do you manage a team of people? If so, have you ever wondered what your staff think of you? Sure, your job isn’t to make friends with your employees. It’s to manage them, right? Still, there are right and wrong ways to go about doing that.

You might feel that you’re the best boss in the world, yet the truth might prove otherwise! In today’s blog post, I will share with you five reasons why your staff might hate you! If any of them apply, I’ll also give you some tips on how to improve things with your workers.

  1. You hinder what other people do each day

As a boss, one of your many tasks is to oversee what your staff do. Some managers decide to leave employees to it while others “hover” over their workers! Does the latter sound like what you do? If so, you are perhaps annoying and even insulting the intelligence of your staff!

There is a fine line between advising and dictating what they should do! As humans, we can only learn from our mistakes. Yes, you don’t want your employees to make any errors. But, we aren’t a perfect species.

You should identify areas where your employees may need extra training in their work. Once you’ve done that, you should arrange for a pro to give them the training they need. That way, you can concentrate on other areas of your job.

  1. You treat your staff like they are robots

Did someone once say to you “treat them mean, keep them keen”? If so, why on Earth do you follow that phrase in a literal sense? Your employees are people, just like you. They also have feelings, as do you!

 

If you go around treating them like a piece of dirt, you won’t earn their respect. In fact, they will usually spend their time cursing you behind your back! I don’t know about you, but I wouldn’t want to work in an environment like that.

Just because someone works for you doesn’t mean you can treat them like a slave. Nor should you humiliate them, especially in front of their co-workers. If you want a phrase or saying to follow, here’s a new one for you:

“Treat others how you would like to get treated.”

In other words, be nice to you and treat them with the respect that they deserve. No-one is saying you need to be best friends with all your workers, of course. But, you should be polite, civil and courteous with your staff. There is nothing demotivating in the workplace than having someone “bark” at you!

  1. You have a hidden agenda

A bad management practice is to use your staff as pawns in a mental game. For example, you might want to impress your superiors so that you can get a promotion. Or one of your workers might catch your eye, and you want to date them.

Whatever the reason, hidden agendas in the workplace are a no-no for managers! Your staff might not wish to complain of what you’re doing for fear of losing their jobs. And so, they’ll just end up hating you until they’ve had enough and quit.

If you want your staff to trust you, it’s crucial you remain transparent with them. Don’t give them a reason to think you’ve got a hidden agenda. It will seldom end in a good result for you!

  1. You are harsh to people that take time off sick

Let’s face it; we all have to take some time off work when we are feeling unwell. There is always the temptation to “rough it out” and keep working. But, there comes a point where we don’t have the energy to even stand up!

Sometimes, we might end up taking long-term sick leave because of a medical condition. If that happens with your workers, being harsh to them on their return is a bad idea.

If you’re trying to make them feel guilty for leaving you in the lurch, stop. All you will do is make them want to resign!

Instead, you need to offer a helping hand. Often, it makes sense to get an external firm to give extra support to your employees. Check out websites like www.healthassured.org to see what I mean. Don’t just expect people to carry on working without any issue!

For instance, some folks might need changes to their working environment. Especially if something in the workplace caused them to be ill in the first place!

  1. You never praise people for a job well done

Last, but not least, you should remember we all want to feel valued in what we do. Let’s say that you manage some telesales people. You will want your boss to thank you for exceeding sales targets this month. That’s because you wish to receive recognition for being a good manager.

In a similar way, those telesales staff want to feel that you noticed their good work. Believe it or not, praise is a good motivation tool. It doesn’t matter if you earn a small wage or a six-figure salary. What does matter is you recognise the efforts of your team.

Of course, you don’t need to praise them for everything they do. After all; your staff are getting paid to do a job! Sometimes, it’s nice to have a “pat on the back” when you go above and beyond the call of duty.

There are many ways you can praise your staff for doing well. For instance, you could offer them an incentive like a cash bonus. Or even a token gesture like a day off that doesn’t get taken from their holiday allowance.

You could even treat your team to a night out on the company. It’s a chance to show your workers that you’re also a human being too, just like them!

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