Absolutely Crucial Elements Your Website Has To Exploit

August 3rd, 2021 | Posted in Marketing, Uncategorized

Once upon a time, having a website was enough to set your business out from the crowd. People used to think, ‘wow, a website. That is amazing’! See, back in the day, before technology became so commonplace, we were easily impressed.

Today that is not the case because a website is the least that a consumer expects from your business. Today, having a website isn’t enough; your website has to be perfect. Obviously, that is not an easy thing to achieve, and many don’t because they don’t know what to include and what to omit.

For your information, here are five elements that your website absolutely cannot forget to implement. Seriously, with regards to websites they are the judge, jury and executioner.

A Succinct And Concise Homepage

A website is a business’ chance to make a good first impression. In fact, a lot of consumers might not even know who you are until they have checked out your internet presence. To avoid angering and confusing them, you need a simple introduction, and your homepage is exactly that. It tells people who you are, what you do and why you are the best option around.

Name Or Logo

To identify with your company, they need a way of identifying who you are. When you think of the biggest companies on the planet, a logo instantly springs to mind, like the McDonald’s M. That is the dream, but for a lot of companies it is not the reality. Alternatively, your name will suffice. A good tip is to keep the name of your domain and your company the same. That way, no one gets confused, and it is easy to spot.

Easy Navigation

If people cannot surf your site, they will leave to another competitor. There are far too many companies on your side of the market that will give them what they want if you cannot. As a result, they will start a quick Google search and forget you in less than a second. All you need to do is make sure the layout allows easy access, and it is pretty. Looks are striking and impress the user, and easy access allows the user to find the information they need quickly and efficiently. The last thing you want to do is annoy them and make them angry, which is why most businesses go with a pro.

Search Engine Optimisation

The key to a successful website is creating traffic. Traffic is the amount of people who visit your site on a daily basis. The more traffic, the more chance you have of converting views into sales. Sounds easy, right? And it is, to a degree. Content is key because original content will create a buzz and keep people coming back for more. Plus, maximise your keywords throughout your site. Consider what you offer and what people will type in to find your services. Effective keywords will get you further up the Google ranking system.

E-commerce

However, viewers cannot buy if there is no portal that allows them the luxury. E-commerce allows you turn your views into sales, which is why you need a quality partner. Magento development is one of the best e-commerce services around, and it will be vital to your company in the future.

Without these elements, your website is doomed to fail.


Use These Top Tips To Help Your Retail Business Grow Its Customer Base

August 1st, 2021 | Posted in Marketing, Uncategorized

 

Running a retail business can be hard work because of all the competition out there. As a result, finding customers can be tricky. If you want to know how to expand your customer base, then try out some of these tips:

Accept Multiple Payment Options

If you’re wondering why you aren’t getting many customers, then it could be down to a very interesting reason. Many consumers don’t carry cash around anymore, they just have their cards or use smartphones to pay for things. So, if they walk into a store that only accepts cash, they aren’t going to be interested. I find that many people are more likely to spend their money at a place with multiple payment options.

So, if you only accept cash, you’ll need to look at broadening your payment options. Look for companies like Payline Data that can set up credit and debit card payments in your store. It would also be a good idea to look for a device that lets you accept NFC payments too. If you do this, you’re allowing everyone to come into your store and buy things. Whereas before, you were only catering to people that carry cash around with them. As a result, your retail business will soon start growing its customer base.

Create A Twitter/Facebook Page

One of the best ways to get more customers is by utilizing social media. All of the successful retail businesses have professionally run Twitter and Facebook pages. There are, obviously, other social media platforms out there, but these two are the biggest and best. If you’re on social media, you can start to market and advertise your business to more people. It can get you noticed by far more people in your local community, meaning more chances people will come into your store.

They key to a successful Twitter/Facebook page is communication. You should make talking to people your number one priority. Engage with your followers on Twitter and speak to those that like you on Facebook. The more you talk, the more chance it gives you to show off your business. It makes it more likely people will trust your business and thus want to start spending their money at your store.

Develop An Online Store & Mobile App

This next point is sort of like two points fused into one, for the sake of saving time. If you want your retail business to get more customers, you have to offer them an online shopping experience. Not everyone can travel down to your store, but they might hear that you do something they like. So, you have a potential customer that’s willing to spend money, but they can’t because of where they live. If you have an online store, then you have a way for people to buy things from you, no matter how far away they are. It’s a great way increase the number of potential customers you’re getting.

Going hand in hand with this, you should develop a mobile app version of your online store. This makes it easy for people to shop on the move and use your business.



 


How Wearable Tech Could Spark A New Privacy Revolution

July 31st, 2021 | Posted in Information Technology, Technology, Uncategorized

Fears over privacy are nothing new. As users began to see the sheer availability of information online, and the amount of personal data being seen and used by tech companies, they became rightly concerned over how much information would be available to companies and individuals, and how that information would be used. The increasing stream of news about the scope and intensity of government-backed surveillance programs has only added to the paranoia.

As we enter a new era of technology marked bywearable devices like the Apple Watch and Google Glass, those fears — which have been simmering in the minds of consumers for years — may finally begin to boil over.

The Problem With Apps

When it comes to user privacy, there are two kinds of apps to worry about. The first kind is designed to gather information about a user. For example, social media apps go out of their way to draw as much information about their users as possible. This is advantageous for both users and companies — users get more involved with their networks, and companies get more information to sell to advertisers.

However, this can be concerning to users who do not wish their information to be sold or to be publicly available. The same is true for tracking-style apps like Xora, an app whose deletion prompted the recent firing of an employee who resented the idea of being tracked 24/7.

The second kind may seem counterintuitive: apps dedicated to preserving user privacy. Snapchat, an app supposedly dedicated to anonymity and user-data protection, was recently the victim of multiple information leaks. These types of apps are dangerous because they lull users into a sometimes-false sense of security, prompting them to allow more of their information to be used without realizing the finer details of each company’s unique privacy policy.

But the real problem with apps is in their nature. Because they’re installed on a device, and often running in the background, they can constantly draw in new information about a user. Compare this to a few generations back, when the Internet could only be accessed through a hard-wired machine for specific, designated periods of time.

Wearable devices exaggerate these problems in two ways. First, they’re increasing the popularity of apps over traditional web browsing experiences. Because wearable devices have smaller screens and more intuitive interfaces, users will begin relying on apps over any other type of function or service.

Second, they’re being used in real-time. Rather than relying on a stationary desktop device or occasionally checking in on a previous-generation mobile device, wearable devices are worn and used on the go. This means greater volumes of streaming information and fewer stopgaps for the end user.

Fears Already Manifesting

Wearable devices are already starting to worry some experts about the security of private user data. Every generation of technology opens the door to new possibilities, but also opens the door to new vulnerabilities. Security professionals argue that the Apple Watch is a relatively secure device, at least compared to comparable wearable devices currently on the market — but the potential vulnerabilities are still a major unknown.

The Chinese Army has already taken measures to ban the use of the Apple Watch entirely. While China’s acts of censorship and routine banishments of Western technologies aren’t exactly new, their take-no-chances stance reflects a very real, logical concern.

What This Means For The Future Of Users

As more people become aware of the privacy threats marked by wearable devices, there could be a very significant leap forward in security and user privacy in tech companies. Responding to public concerns, app developers can make greater efforts to secure their apps and clearly explain their privacy policies. Device makers like Apple and Google can go on record about the potential vulnerabilities of their devices and inform the public about the best ways to protect themselves.

Perhaps most importantly, government organizations can step in to create some much-needed regulations about user privacy and corporate privacy policies. Already, the European Union is stepping in to protect userprivacy concerns as they relate to Google’s search engine and core products — the next step would be formalizing those regulations across the board for any devices and technologies, and institute those regulations in countries throughout the world.

The trade-off is, of course, that increased regulations mean decreased liberties — both for individuals and corporations. While some will push for strict regulations and tighter privacyand security, others will maintain that personal freedoms are more important than a fleeting idea of safety.

What’s important here is not where the issue will settle, but the fact that the issue will soon be up for debate. Regardless of where these regulations and new approaches to privacyland, wearable devices are about to provoke a new revolution in user privacy.


Here Is How To Address Car Hacking Threats

July 29th, 2021 | Posted in Communication, Information Technology, Uncategorized

When you connect a car to the Internet, it is no longer just a car: It is a computer on wheels.

For years, the security industry has asked itself, “When will cyberattacks affect the physical world?” The connected car is a clear example of where this manifests, especially as researchers release new information about vehicles’ vulnerabilities, such as my partner Marc Rogers’ and my deep dive into Tesla’s systems, or the recent Jeep Cherokee analysis, wherein researchers breached the vehicle’s drive systems from the Internet, slowing the vehicle to a crawl on a highway. Fiat Chrysler has since recalled more than one million vehicles as a result, and legislation aptly named the “Security and Privacy in your Car Act” is currently in consideration by Congress.

When a car can search Google, send tweets and be remotely accessed from a smartphone app, that car has more in common with your laptop than it does the Model T. Securing the next generation of connected automobiles means redefining what it means for a vehicle to be “road-ready.” The road-ready vehicle of the future needs cybersecurity measures beyond the traditional physical safety measures taken today.

It is inevitable that automobiles — alongside every other essential technology in our lives — become connected. Given how important cars and trucks are to both individuals and the world’s economy as a whole, it’s entirely expected that attackers will focus their energy on disrupting vehicles’ (hopefully) well-designed systems.

Thankfully, nothing catastrophic has happened yet, and the auto industry is in position to take necessary action to get ahead of this problem. However, it needs to learn from the software industry’s experience on the front lines of the Internet, something most auto manufacturers have yet to do.

For example, as part of its mission to reinvent the automobile, Tesla has taken a software-first approach to itscars. Knowing that the people will expect their car to be connected to the Internet, the conversation internally never was “when these cars become Internet-connected,” it always was “how can we build a great connected car?”

As with any software-driven product, cybersecurity must be a deliberate investment. Today, the auto industry can take three specific measures to dramatically improve the cybersecurity of its vehicles.

First, vehicles need over-the-air update systems to avoid expensive and lengthy recalls every time a security vulnerability is found. Second, manufacturers must separate infotainment systems and the critical drive systems, tightly controlling communication between them, just as commercial airliners isolate inflight Wi-Fi networks from critical avionics systems. Third, manufacturers must assume that some attacks will succeed and secure each individual software component in the vehicle, so that if an attacker compromises a single system they do not automatically get access to the entire vehicle.

While the state of automobile cybersecurity would be substantially improved if all manufacturers implemented these guidelines, they are just a start. It takes years for a company to develop a strong cybersecurity culture; even with a strong internal cybersecurity team, that team must be supported by and integrated into the organization as a whole.

Further, companies with experienced security teams look not just inside the company for support, but outside to the global community of security researchers identifying problems — and hoping to get them fixed — ahead of criminals. For example, Tesla launched a “Bug Bounty” program to encourage external security researchers to responsibly identify and help fix any security issues they uncover. I encourage all other manufacturers to follow a similar path.

Consider the consequences if the auto industry does not get security right: Manufacturers may need to issue a recall for every software vulnerability found. Recalls are a long process, and software vulnerabilities become a substantial personal safety issue, even a national security concern, if not fixed immediately. Further, if the frequency of software vulnerabilities in vehicles is anywhere near that of PCs — monthly and even weekly in some cases — recalls quickly become impractical.

I sincerely hope that all auto manufacturers proactively address cybersecurity, starting with the guidelines above, to make automobiles one of the most secure pieces of technology in our lives.


How Does The Free CCleaner Compare With Other Registry Cleaners?

July 27th, 2021 | Posted in Computer, Data Recovery, Uncategorized

CCleaner, a registry repair tool that comes in both a free and a paid version, created by the Piriform company, is known for being a blazingly fast registry cleaner. In fact, we’ve timed it on our office computer, and it finished a registry scan in just under 15 seconds. It only picked up one error. Our first question was: How thorough a scan was that?

Other registry cleaners that we’ve run on our computer have taken anywhere from a minute or more (many in the two to four minute range) to more than six or eight minutes, and in some cases up to 14 minutes. Our natural curiosity wonders how a scan that only lasts for 15 seconds can possibly be as thorough as a two or four or six minute scan.

Obviously, CCleaner doesn’t scan as many files as these other cleaners. How can it in fifteen seconds? And our results have born out these findings. Other cleaners, like RegCure, have ended up picking up more errors and empty entries in their scans than CCleaner. RegCure picked up eighty-six errors on the same machine in which CCleaner only picked up one. But then that’s attributable to the variation in the search algorithm used. Each utility has its own definition of parameters for choosing what it ranks as an error in the registry. Some, choose to error on the side of caution, and therefore pick up fewer errors.

While we like the free version of CCleaner, we just can’t get over the fact that it only picks up a fraction of the errors that other utilities pick up. And it does this on a regular basis. What counts, though, is the fact that your registry hasn’t been damaged by the cleaning, and you’re still able to use it without having to restore the backup of the old registry. In other words, it doesn’t disable the use of the computer.

One of CCleaner’s main selling features is that it can do more than just clean the registry. It comes with a system cleaning function (to clean up old and unused system files and logs), a Tools function (with tools to uninstall programs, manage your system’s start-up menu, find a missing file, restore the system to an earlier date, and a drive wiper), and an Options tab (that allows you to manage cookies, an include/exclude function for files to be cleaned), and an Advanced settings tab (which, among other things, allows you to restore the default settings as well as nine other items).

While we cannot give CCleaner a one-hundred percent recommendation with regard to its registry cleaning ability, we can say that it may be a useful program to have with regard to its other capabilities if you don’t already use another program that will easily access these other maintenance options.

In the final analysis, all we can say is that CCleaner may be a program you might want to consider having around as an additional registry repair tool. It’s main attractiveness, for us and perhaps you also, comes in the added feature functions it can perform. However, we don’t consider it to be powerful enough to be a frontline tool for keeping your registry unclogged. Use it as a backup or an adjunct, but not as your main registry utility.